TurtleArt

techniques and styles

A workshop led by Artemis Papert and Brian Silverman


TurtleArt is a microworld for making art with code. It allows you to explore art, turtle geometry, and math. It brings programming and art together. The main focus of TurtleArt is to create static, two dimensional images. This workshop goes beyond the basics to explore programming approaches and techniques that are used in Turtle Art, and the various styles of drawings that are possible in this medium.

Prerequisite:

You should be familiar with the basics of Turtle Art before attending this workshop. If you've taken an introductory Turtle Art workshop such as this one, you'll be all set. You can also learn about Turtle Art by going to Getting Started with TurtleArt. Work on the introductions and look at the samples and snippets.  

When:

Saturday, December 12, 2020, 10:00 am to noon EST

Where:

Everywhere via Zoom

Cost:

$15 per person
Free for people who participated in the 2020 Virtual Logo Summer Institute









About the workshop leaders:

  • Artemis Papert is an artist creating art in both traditional, mainly acrylic and pastel, and digital media, using code as the medium. After a first career as a research biologist she retrained in the healing art of shiatsu. With an interest in dream and fairy tale interpretation and as a lifelong learner, she is currently training to become a Jungian psychoanalyst. Artemis has led TurtleArt workshops for a wide variety of groups in many countries.

  • Since the late 1970s, Brian Silverman has been involved in the invention of learning environments for children. His work includes dozens of LOGO versions, LogoWriter and MicroWorlds among them, Scratch, LEGO® robotics, TurtleArt, the PicoCricket, and the Phantom Fish Tank. Brian has been a Visiting Scientist at the MIT Media Lab, enjoys recreational math, and is a computer scientist and master tinkerer. He once even built a tic-tac-toe playing computer out of TinkerToys.

Resources